Scientific Panels

  1. Scientific Leaders Discuss HFCS and the Effects on Our Bodies

    The State of the Science on Dietary Sweeteners Containing Fructose

    In March 2008, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service and the International Life Sciences Institute of North America held a joint conference to discuss current research around high fructose corn syrup and obesity.

    The conference brought together several scientific leaders from varying backgrounds, including former critics of high fructose corn syrup. They found there is little evidence that high fructose corn syrup and sugar have different effects on satiety, overall energy balance and body metabolism. This research suggests there is no unique connection between high fructose corn syrup and obesity.

    A scientific summary of the conference was published in a supplement to the June 2008 issue of the Journal of Nutrition, entitled, “The State of the Science on Dietary Sweeteners Containing Fructose.”

    Citation: The state of the science on dietary sweeteners containing fructose: summary and issues to be resolved. Journal of Nutrition 139(6): 1269S-1270S, June 2009. Suzanne P. Murphy, Ph.D., R.D.

  2. High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS): Everything You Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask

    The annual American Society for Nutrition Public Information Committee symposium for 2007 served as a platform to address the controversy surrounding high fructose corn syrup. Speakers from academia and industry came together to provide up-to-date information on this food ingredient. The data presented indicated that HFCS is very similar to sugar, and thus, not surprisingly, few metabolic differences were found comparing the two sweeteners.

    A summary of the symposium was published in the December 2008 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, entitled, “High-fructose corn syrup: everything you wanted to know, but were afraid to ask.”

    Citation: High-fructose corn syrup: everything you wanted to know, but were afraid to ask. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Vol. 88, No. 6, 1715S, December 2008. Victor Fulgoni, III