General HFCS Composition and Effect on the Body

Below are studies providing a general analysis of high fructose corn syrup composition and how the body handles it.

  1. High-Fructose Corn Syrup: Controversies and Common Sense.
    American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. 4(6):515-520. November 2010. White JS, Foreyt JP, Melanson KJ, Angelopoulos TJ.

    In composition, high-fructose corn syrup, sucrose, honey, invert sugar, and concentrated fruit juices are essentially interchangeable. Human studies to date have shown no significant differences in metabolic, endocrine, hormonal, or appetitive responses to these caloric sweeteners. This review explores the metabolic and nutritional effects of high-fructose corn syrup with a particular emphasis on its relationship to sucrose, the sweetener it replaced in many food products.

    The full text of the report is available by clicking here.
     
  2. Straight talk about high-fructose corn syrup effects: what it is and what it ain't.
    American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Vol. 88, No. 6, 1716S-1721S, December 2008. John S. White

    John S. White, Ph.D. reviewed the history, composition, availability and characteristics of high fructose corn syrup to evaluate the strength of the hypothesis that high fructose corn syrup is uniquely responsible for obesity. He concludes that the HFCS-obesity hypothesis is not supported in either the United States or worldwide.

    The full text of the report is available by clicking here.
     
  3. High Fructose Corn Syrups, Part 2: Health Effects.
    Nutrition Today. 41(2):70-77, March/April 2006. Schorin, Marilyn D. PhD, RD, FADA.

    This article explores the health effects of high fructose corn syrup, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, blood lipids, and dental caries. The author concludes, “Given what we know about the metabolism of orally ingested sugars, it is difficult to identify a plausible physiological explanation for how approximately equal amounts of fructose and glucose should have differential effects when chemically bonded (such as in sucrose) or not (such as in HFCS). Thus, the current evidence does not support claims of a specific unique effect of HFCS on health.”

    The full text of the report is available by clicking here.
     
  4. High Fructose Corn Syrups, Part 1: Composition, Consumption, and Metabolism
    Nutrition Today. 40(6):248-252, November/December 2005. Schorin, Marilyn D. PhD, RD, FADA

    High fructose corn syrup, as used in foods, is similar in composition and sweetness to sucrose. Absorption and metabolism of high fructose corn syrup is also similar to that of sucrose. Although introduced into the food supply in 1968, popularity of high fructose corn syrup as a sweetener grew after the Food and Drug Administration's 1983 decision that high fructose corn syrup is Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS). Part 1 of this article explains the composition, consumption patterns, and metabolism of HFCS. Part 2 (published separately) explores the health impact of high fructose corn syrup consumption.

    The full text of the report is available by clicking here.