Infographics and Charts

Looking for a quick way to explain how much HFCS is in the foods we eat or how often it’s consumed? Find useful charts and infographics below to share or use.

Infographics & Graphs

  • HOW ADDED SUGARS CAN FIT INTO A HEALTHY DIET

  • Calories from Fats, Flour & Added Sugars

  • Sources Of Added Calories

  • Average Daily Calories Consumed

  • Obesity and Diabetes Rates

  • Comparison of Sweeteners

  • HFCS in Foods

  • Composition of Sweeteners

  • Per Capita Consumption of Sweeteners

  • HOW ADDED SUGARS CAN FIT INTO A HEALTHY DIET

    HOW ADDED SUGARS CAN FIT INTO A HEALTHY DIET

    Discover the role that added sugars play in a healthy daily diet and see how you can consume them in moderation.

    We all want to eat a healthy diet, but often worry about where added sugars fit into it and how to keep track of them. Added sugars- such as table sugar, high fructose corn syrup, honey, agave nectar, etc. - all contain calories, but they can be part of a balanced diet when consumed in moderation.

    Using the USDA's Food Tracker tool, an example of a full day of meals is shown below that fits the MyPlate dietary guidelines. These meals highlight food group portions, total calories and amount of empty calories to give you an idea of how to eat within a balanced, healthy diet.

    Click on a meal to see the calories and added sugars in it.

    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    • BREAKFAST
    • MORNING SNACK
    • LUNCH
    • AFTERNOON SNACK
    • DINNER
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    • Total Meal Calories 336
    • Total Meal Calories 95
    • Total Meal Calories 659
    • Total Meal Calories 254
    • Total Meal Calories 636
     
     

    1 Cup Honey Nut Cheerios with skim milk

    228 cal

    Total Calories

    48 cal

    Added Sugars

    0 cal

    Solid Fats

    Turkey sandwich with low fat cheese, mayo and spinach

    411 cal

    Total Calories

    8 cal

    Added Sugars

    31 cal

    Solid Fats

    16 oz fruit smoothie with skim milk

    254 cal

    Total Calories

    78 cal

    Added Sugars

    0 cal

    Solid Fats

    1 cup whole wheat pasta with meat & vegetable sauce

    431 cal

    Total Calories

    1 cal

    Added Sugars

    54 cal

    Solid Fats

     

    1.

    According to the American Heart Association (AHA), "Names for added sugars that appear on food label ingredient lists include agave nectar, brown sugar, corn sweetener, corn syrup, dextrose, evaporated cane juice, fructose, fruit juice concentrates, glucose, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), honey, invert sugar, lactose, maltose, malt syrup, maple syrup, molasses, raw sugar, sucrose, sugar, and syrup."

    NOTE:

    The numbers above are based on a 2000 calorie limit diet with an empty calories limit of 258 calories and do not take into account exercise or other calorie-expenditure activities. Empty calories can include added sugars and solid fats. The numbers are shown as examples only and you should consult your doctor to determine your specific calorie and added sugars limit based on your lifestyle.

    Embed Infographic

    embed
    X
    <a href="http://www.sweetsurprise.com/charts-and-media-about-hfcs#452"><img src="" /></a><h3>HOW ADDED SUGARS CAN FIT INTO A HEALTHY DIET</h3><p>

    HOW ADDED SUGARS CAN FIT INTO A HEALTHY DIET

    Discover the role that added sugars play in a healthy daily diet and see how you can consume them in moderation.

    We all want to eat a healthy diet, but often worry about where added sugars fit into it and how to keep track of them. Added sugars- such as table sugar, high fructose corn syrup, honey, agave nectar, etc. - all contain calories, but they can be part of a balanced diet when consumed in moderation.

    Using the USDA's Food Tracker tool, an example of a full day of meals is shown below that fits the MyPlate dietary guidelines. These meals highlight food group portions, total calories and amount of empty calories to give you an idea of how to eat within a balanced, healthy diet.

    Click on a meal to see the calories and added sugars in it.

    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    • BREAKFAST
    • MORNING SNACK
    • LUNCH
    • AFTERNOON SNACK
    • DINNER
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    • Total Meal Calories 336
    • Total Meal Calories 95
    • Total Meal Calories 659
    • Total Meal Calories 254
    • Total Meal Calories 636
     
     

    1 Cup Honey Nut Cheerios with skim milk

    228 cal

    Total Calories

    48 cal

    Added Sugars

    0 cal

    Solid Fats

    Turkey sandwich with low fat cheese, mayo and spinach

    411 cal

    Total Calories

    8 cal

    Added Sugars

    31 cal

    Solid Fats

    16 oz fruit smoothie with skim milk

    254 cal

    Total Calories

    78 cal

    Added Sugars

    0 cal

    Solid Fats

    1 cup whole wheat pasta with meat & vegetable sauce

    431 cal

    Total Calories

    1 cal

    Added Sugars

    54 cal

    Solid Fats

     

    1.

    According to the American Heart Association (AHA), "Names for added sugars that appear on food label ingredient lists include agave nectar, brown sugar, corn sweetener, corn syrup, dextrose, evaporated cane juice, fructose, fruit juice concentrates, glucose, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), honey, invert sugar, lactose, maltose, malt syrup, maple syrup, molasses, raw sugar, sucrose, sugar, and syrup."

    NOTE:

    The numbers above are based on a 2000 calorie limit diet with an empty calories limit of 258 calories and do not take into account exercise or other calorie-expenditure activities. Empty calories can include added sugars and solid fats. The numbers are shown as examples only and you should consult your doctor to determine your specific calorie and added sugars limit based on your lifestyle.

    Embed Infographic

    </p>

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  • Calories from Fats, Flour & Added Sugars

    As we continue to add calories to our diet, more of those calories come from flour and cereal products as well as added fats, rather than from added sugars.

    embed
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    <a href="http://www.sweetsurprise.com/charts-and-media-about-hfcs#564"><img src="http://sweetsurprise.com/sites/default/files/infographics/Average-Daily-Calories-Consumed_Fats-Flour-Sugars_0.png" /></a><h3>Calories from Fats, Flour & Added Sugars</h3><p>

    As we continue to add calories to our diet, more of those calories come from flour and cereal products as well as added fats, rather than from added sugars.

    </p>

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    Calories from Fats, Flour and Added Sugars 1970-2010
  • Sources Of Added Calories

    In the last 40 years, we’ve added 474 calories to our diet. Of those additional calories, added sugars contributed 7% while added fats accounted for 52% and flour and cereal products contributed 38% to the rise.

    embed
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    <a href="http://www.sweetsurprise.com/charts-and-media-about-hfcs#235"><img src="http://sweetsurprise.com/sites/default/files/infographics/Sources-Of-Added-Calories.png" /></a><h3>Sources Of Added Calories</h3><p>

    In the last 40 years, we’ve added 474 calories to our diet. Of those additional calories, added sugars contributed 7% while added fats accounted for 52% and flour and cereal products contributed 38% to the rise.

    </p>

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    Sources of Added Calories 1970-2010
  • Average Daily Calories Consumed

    High fructose corn syrup has been erroneously blamed for uniquely contributing to the current rise in obesity in the United States. Despite this claim, the consumption of high fructose corn syrup has actually declined since its peak in 1999. Americans are consuming more calories from all types of foods today than what we consumed 40 years ago.

    embed
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    <a href="http://www.sweetsurprise.com/charts-and-media-about-hfcs#233"><img src="http://sweetsurprise.com/sites/default/files/infographics/Average-Daily-Calories-Consumed.png" /></a><h3>Average Daily Calories Consumed</h3><p>

    High fructose corn syrup has been erroneously blamed for uniquely contributing to the current rise in obesity in the United States. Despite this claim, the consumption of high fructose corn syrup has actually declined since its peak in 1999. Americans are consuming more calories from all types of foods today than what we consumed 40 years ago.

    </p>

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    Average Daily Calories Consumed by Americans 1970-2010
  • Obesity and Diabetes Rates

    Despite the myths, there is no scientific evidence to suggest that high fructose corn syrup is uniquely responsible for people becoming obese. Obesity results from an imbalance of calories consumed and calories burned. USDA data shows that per capita consumption of high fructose corn syrup is actually on the decline, while obesity and diabetes rates continue to rise, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    embed
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    <a href="http://www.sweetsurprise.com/charts-and-media-about-hfcs#231"><img src="http://sweetsurprise.com/sites/default/files/infographics/Sweetener-Consumption-Obesity-Diabetes.png" /></a><h3>Obesity and Diabetes Rates</h3><p>

    Despite the myths, there is no scientific evidence to suggest that high fructose corn syrup is uniquely responsible for people becoming obese. Obesity results from an imbalance of calories consumed and calories burned. USDA data shows that per capita consumption of high fructose corn syrup is actually on the decline, while obesity and diabetes rates continue to rise, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    </p>

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    USDA data shows that per capita consumption of high fructose corn syrup is actually on the decline, while obesity and diabetes rates continue to rise, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  • Comparison of Sweeteners

    The food, drink and health products you buy and use every day get their sweet taste from a variety of sweeteners. Take a quick, side-by-side look at some of the most common types of sweeteners you'll see on nutrition labels.

    embed
    X
    <a href="http://www.sweetsurprise.com/charts-and-media-about-hfcs#230"><img src="http://sweetsurprise.com/sites/default/files/infographics/Comparison-Chart.png" /></a><h3>Comparison of Sweeteners</h3><p>

    The food, drink and health products you buy and use every day get their sweet taste from a variety of sweeteners. Take a quick, side-by-side look at some of the most common types of sweeteners you'll see on nutrition labels.

    </p>

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  • HFCS in Foods

    There has been confusion about just how much HFCS is contained in every day foods. In fact, many foods only contain small amounts of high fructose corn syrup. See just how little is used in some foods.

    embed
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    <a href="http://www.sweetsurprise.com/charts-and-media-about-hfcs#229"><img src="http://sweetsurprise.com/sites/default/files/infographics/Servings-Daily-Allowance.png" /></a><h3>HFCS in Foods</h3><p>

    There has been confusion about just how much HFCS is contained in every day foods. In fact, many foods only contain small amounts of high fructose corn syrup. See just how little is used in some foods.

    </p>

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  • Composition of Sweeteners

    Despite its name, high fructose corn syrup is relatively low in fructose when compared with some other sweeteners such as agave nectar. In fact, most common caloric sweeteners including honey, table sugar and HFCS have similar compositions: They contain fructose and glucose in approximately equal proportions.

    embed
    X
    <a href="http://www.sweetsurprise.com/charts-and-media-about-hfcs#92"><img src="http://sweetsurprise.com/sites/default/files/infographics/Composition-of-Sweeteners.png" /></a><h3>Composition of Sweeteners</h3><p>

    Despite its name, high fructose corn syrup is relatively low in fructose when compared with some other sweeteners such as agave nectar. In fact, most common caloric sweeteners including honey, table sugar and HFCS have similar compositions: They contain fructose and glucose in approximately equal proportions.

    </p>

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  • Per Capita Consumption of Sweeteners

    From the 1970s through 2000 as high fructose corn syrup consumption generally increased, sugar consumption reciprocally decreased according to USDA data. Since 2003, however, sugar consumption has held steady while HFCS consumption has been on the decline.

    embed
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    <a href="http://www.sweetsurprise.com/charts-and-media-about-hfcs#91"><img src="http://sweetsurprise.com/sites/default/files/infographics/Sweetener-Consumption.png" /></a><h3>Per Capita Consumption of Sweeteners </h3><p>

    From the 1970s through 2000 as high fructose corn syrup consumption generally increased, sugar consumption reciprocally decreased according to USDA data. Since 2003, however, sugar consumption has held steady while HFCS consumption has been on the decline.

    </p>

    Please highlight the above code and use Ctrl-C (Cmd-C for Mac) to copy the text.

    From the 1970s through 2000 as high fructose corn syrup consumption generally increased, sugar consumption reciprocally decreased according to USDA data. Since 2003, however, sugar consumption has held steady while HFCS consumption has been on the decline.